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How to make Virtual Midi Piano Keyboard sound like a real piano?

08/29/2011 08:14 by jvanhorn

I have Virtual Midi Piano Keyboard but the piano doesn't sound like a real piano (e.g. Zebra Keys Z-Board does sound like a real piano). How can I fix this? I've tried the controls but I don't get the right sound. Or do you know of another software that has the sound of a real piano?
First answer posted by SteveQueen at 08/29/2011 08:16
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8 Answers
  • SteveQueen
  • I am a bit new to this, but this is one reason why I did not use a mac!

    VST synths are great and many are free

    You may need a "host" program to run the instruments

    Your host can also be something like cakewalk or acid

    Also, a good controller can help to input a good realistic performance

    Some pro piano VSTs can be hundreds of bucks, just warning you - hope you are not on protool$!!!

    Source(s):

  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 08/29/2011 08:16
  • NataliaPeterson
  • Well, I'm using a Mac at the moments, with reason, logic, and garageband, etc. I have kontakt player with a grand piano sound, it's brilliant! But i have also been using the orchestra steinway with the garageband jam packs (symphony orchestra) and it sounds very good, but it's difficult to get a really, REAL sound.
  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 12/08/2011 09:24
  • Kimplex
  • Be sure to use varied velocities in your midi performance, for the most part the lower velocities sound more natural... Varying velocity will certainly make the performance more human. Emulate a room through reverbs... Usually helps in creating a more convincing picture, since no one ever hears a piano without a room.
  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 12/08/2011 09:25
  • DanielSimon
  • To split the performance into say three or four different tracks, the "lower" octaves, the "middle" octaves, and the "upper" octaves, and then assign slightly differing patches to each track.
    That was the core of what wasn't working: any single patch on its own never went from low to high in a reasonable-sounding way. The lower registers needed a beefier, doubled patch maybe, whereas the mids needed clarity and bite and the highs needed a bit of a sheen.
    Also, doubling the piano patch with a small percentage of a string pad or something can make it sing more... and you don't necessarily notice this bit of trickery in the midst of a dense mix.
  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 12/08/2011 09:27
  • SteveQueen
  • Buy a GREAT piano VSTi or sampler. And you're done
  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 12/08/2011 09:29
  • Anonymous user
  • You need to check out Synthogy's line of software: www.synthogy.com
  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 01/13/2012 04:50
  • Anonymous user
  • Try this VSTi http://www.megavst.com/piano/cv-piano/ Or buy the paid ones
  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 09/13/2014 18:09
  • Anonymous user
  • Try these virtual instrument

    CV Piano > http://www.megavst.com/piano/cv-piano/

    Keyzone > http://www.megavst.com/piano/keyzone/

  • Was this answer helpful? 00 · 09/20/2014 05:19
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